I think maybe my comment got eaten up. If someone here can help me, I'm a newb when it comes to smartwatches, but I'm looking for a budget watch that I can use to voice operate Google Assistant on my phone. I like to listen to music as I drive connected via aux, and it's annoying and dangerous to pick up my phone and speak "Okay Google, Next Song" into it.
Wirecutter writers have been researching, testing, and writing about smartwatches since early 2013, just after the first Pebble watches were shipped to Kickstarter backers. I’ve personally worn nearly every notable smartwatch since that first Pebble and have written about them for a number of publications, including IT World and Fast Company. I also have extensive experience with Android phones, having written the (since outdated) Complete Android Guide and numerous articles about Android. I also contribute to and help edit the Wirecutter guide to the best smartwatch for iPhones.

We’ve chosen the Kate Spade Scallop not only because of this but also for its realistic price of $295. The smartwatch has been engineered using the latest technology, so the profile is neat and slim, and therefore less intrusive than older smartwatches. The screen measures 1.2-inches and is encased in a body that is only 9mm thick and 42mm wide. There are several different strap options and variations on the gold body color available.


I'm not interested in wearing a chunky 'manstyle' watch. Did you remove the 'best for women' category? I don't know why you would care what gamers think.... they are (thankfully for the productivity of the human race) .000000000001% of the population. I'm not walking into a business meeting in Dubai or Seoul with a giant man watch rock on my wrist. Any watch that looks like something men wore in the 90s is not going to appeal to women. More women friendly choices please!!
Like a number of the Android Wear watches in our guide, the Huawei Watch 2 Sport features the Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 processor. It's a competent, albeit aging, chip that, along with 768MB of RAM, is more than capable of handling the lightweight Wear OS operating system. The 1.2-inch screen is on the smaller side, but it boasts sharp colors and solid brightness.
The Apple Watch has topped our best smartwatches list for a while, so it shouldn’t be a surprise to see the latest Series 4 model also beating the pack. However, it’s not just by a whisker, or with numerous caveats. It’s the best smartwatch by far, and a device that has genuinely earned a 5-out-of 5-stars rating. This doesn’t happen very often, and to find out why it did, read our review (above) for the full story.

Why? It’s mainly because of the way you interact with it using the Samsung Galaxy Watch, and other recent Samsung smartwatches including our last pick, the Gear Sport. Tizen relies on a rotating bezel which helps you zip through the menus quickly and simply, rather than prodding and swiping on a tiny touchscreen for every interaction. The bezel rotates with a satisfying click, and minimizing screen touches helps keep the 1.3-inch AMOLED screen (a smaller Galaxy Watch with a 1.2-inch screen is also available) clear of too many fingerprints. That’s always a bonus.
Most smartwatches have a fitness component for the very good reason that a watch is moving with you throughout the day. For counting steps, encouraging activity, and tracking occasional long walks, runs, or bike rides, most smartwatches will do fine. If you want a device to track your everyday runs or cycling sessions, you want a GPS running watch. If you’re serious about tracking and improving your movement and sleep, a fitness tracker will do that for less money and look more discreet doing so (and if you have health insurance, you may get a discount or incentives to use one). There are smartwatches that lean heavily toward sports and fitness in their marketing, but there are drawbacks to each of them not found in a dedicated device. At the other extreme, if you all you really need is step counting, a hybrid smartwatch—with an analog face like a traditional watch, but with built-in motion sensors and months-long battery life—may be a better option.
If you attribute "thinnest" or "most fashionable" to the word "women", then you literally have ZERO argument. You're trying to push some PC agenda by demoralizing the idea in associating it with a stereotype on your own. Its laughable and makes you look extremely ridiculous. It's apparent that you completely agree with the fact that something small and stylish is FOR WOMEN. 

Naturally, the first thing you'll want to consider when buying a smartwatch is compatibility. Most of the devices currently available use Wear OS, Google's operating system for wearables. Wear OS supports iOS, but make sure to find out if the features you want are available on iOS before buying in. Fitbit OS and Samsung's Tizen also support both Android and iOS. The Apple Watch, as you'd expect, connects strictly to iOS-powered devices, so it's iPhone-only. Make sure to pick a watch that's compatible with the mobile device you own.
If you don’t need your smartwatch to look business-casual, you want more fitness and exercise features than our top pick, or you’re a Samsung loyalist, the Samsung Gear Sport is a better pick for you. (You can use the Gear Sport with non-Samsung phones, but doing so requires that you install at least four apps.) The Gear Sport handles all the casual notification and message-triage functions of a smartwatch about as well as our top pick—with the exception of voice transcription—but it adds heart-rate monitoring, GPS tracking, swim tracking, and built-in reminders to move throughout the day. It doesn’t do all of these things perfectly, but it does just enough to make for a generally useful smartwatch, with great battery life and a clever interface.

The primary differences with the Classic versus the standard include, first off, that this model lacks LTE. That, however, does mean that the Classic is built from a more premium “Titanium Grey” shell which has a bit less sporty look. A leather band is also installed out of the box rather than the silicone one found on other models. Pricing on the Huawei Watch 2 Classic is a bit higher than the standard model, asking $369 from retailers such as Amazon and Best Buy.

The Asus ZenWatch 3 was a previous top pick for a Wear OS smartwatch. As of now, it has reached the end of its Wear OS updates (after a very long delay getting to Android Wear 2.0). Its rotating crown does not actually work to turn or scroll anything on the screen. Its proprietary watch band connections mean that your options are limited to what is available from third parties on Amazon. And the watch is hard to find new.


Apple’s WatchOS is dead simple and so is Samsung’s Tizen. Both offer fully-featured fitness tracking that’s easy to access and intuitive interfaces. On the Galaxy Watch, you just twist the bezel in a circle to navigate through quick launch apps, your full library of apps, and settings. Each app is made to suit the circular OS, so navigation is easy to figure out. You always have a back button if you get lost, too. The addition of Samsung Pay also takes Samsung’s watches to a new level with mobile payments.
It doesn't bother with sporty features like GPS or a heart rate monitor, which is to be expected, but disappointingly doesn't include Google Pay support, either. As far as putting its own spin on Wear OS goes, Louis Vuitton makes more effort than others, including LV Guide and My Flight apps that are built for travellers, and that will help pinpoint places to visit when you're away and even make it easier to board your flight.

The TicWatch E uses outdated processors and arrives very late in the lifespan of this version of Wear OS—with a new Qualcomm chip arriving in early September, there’s not a compelling reason to invest in an Android smartwatch from a lesser-known vendor right now. Beyond that, although it packs in a lot of features for less than $150, including onboard GPS, a heart-rate monitor, and a light-adjusting display, the TicWatch E looks and feels toylike, with an all-plastic body, matte silicone strap, and undistinguished look. It also has a single, non-turning button, which makes it less usable with the latest Wear OS interface. It runs Wear OS fairly well on its budget-minded processor, but Wear OS running even at its intended responsiveness is still not that exciting. The TicWatch E is not a bad budget entry as far as Android Wear watches go, but a better budget smartwatch, probably from the TicWatch’s own maker, is likely in the making.
You don't want a smartwatch with good battery life, right? Good, because you're not going to get it. Watches with full-color, smartphone-like displays, like the Apple Watch and Wear OS watches, only last for about a day on a single charge. Like your phone, you're going to want to throw them on a charger every night before you go to bed. And most of the watches that fall into this category feature screens that turn off after just a few seconds. In order to check the time, you either need to trigger the display with a physical button or a gesture like holding it up to your face.

The watch itself is Samsung’s most stylish yet, and its most watch-like too. It moves away from the sporty style adopted for the Gear S3 and the Gear Sport. Samsung has also dropped the Gear name for the Galaxy Watch, and introduced two case sizes and plenty of straps and colors. We like the 46mm version which only comes in silver, while the 42mm version comes in black or gold.
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