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Spa model girl holding coconut and smiling.

by Brian Shilhavy
Editor, Health Impact News

A new study out of Japan and published in the European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology shows how switching the dietary oil of chow fed to mice from soybean oil to coconut oil reduced skin inflammation.

The skin healing properties of coconut oil, especially virgin coconut oil, applied topically to the skin have been known for a long time.

When we first started importing virgin coconut oil from the Philippines to the U.S. market in 2001, and had started an online discussion group, some of the most powerful testimonies we started receiving from people were how they were using virgin coconut oil for their skin conditions.

Even though coconut oil is sold as a dietary oil, people started applying it topically and seeing tremendous results for their skin conditions such as acne, eczema, keratosis polaris, psoriasis, rosacea, and fungal infections. Read some of these incredible testimonies here:

Virgin Coconut Oil for Skin Health

We have suspected for years that the reason people in tropical climates who eat their traditional diets which are high in the saturated fats of coconut oil had such beautiful skin, even though they are exposed to the sun to a greater degree than westerners, is because of the high amounts of coconut oil in their diet, which does not oxidize and cause free radical damage as polyunsaturated fats do.

Skin cancer, for example, is almost unheard of in tropical climates like the Philippines, but common in western nations, even in colder climates with far less exposure to the sun.

Researchers in Japan apparently wanted to test this theory of dietary coconut oil reducing allergic skin inflammation in the laboratory:

Coconut oil is used as a dietary oil worldwide, and its healthy effects are recognized by the fact that coconut oil is easy to digest, helps in weight management, increases healthy cholesterol and provides instant energy.

Although topical application of coconut oil is known to reduce skin infection and inflammation, whether dietary coconut oil has any role in decreasing skin inflammation is unknown.

In this study, we showed the impact of dietary coconut oil in allergic skin inflammation by using a mouse model of contact hypersensitivity (CHS).

So they replaced the soybean oil commonly used in mice chow with coconut oil.

Soybean oil has been the most common dietary oil in the western diet since World War II, when expeller-pressed seed technology allowed manufactures to extract oil from the soybean, one of the main cash crops in the U.S. and heavily subsidized to dominate the world market in dietary oils.

Soybean oil is high in Omega 6 fatty acids, and it is commonly known that most westerners have an unhealthy balance of Omega 3 to Omega 6 fatty acids leading to various health problems, as most westerners need more Omega 3 fatty acids and far less Omega 6 fatty acids in their diet.

This point was noted by the researchers:

A high n-6/n-3 FA ratio is linked to many chronic inflammatory diseases, including cardiovascular disease, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and inflammatory bowel disease.

Coconut oil does not contain appreciable amounts of either of these classes (Omega 3 or Omega 6) of essential fatty acids.

Previous studies using dietary coconut oil have shown its health benefits toward hepatotoxicity, together with altered lipid profiles in the body.

Another unique feature of coconut oil is the low abundance of both n-3 and n-6 essential FAs.

Omega 3 fatty acids are linked to anti-inflammatory effects, and since coconut oil does not contain any appreciable amount of Omega 3s, they could not be attributed to lower allergic inflammation in the skin with the mice fed the coconut oil diet.

After 2 months of comparing the mice on the standard soybean oil chow and the ones with coconut oil, they found that there was:

Amelioration of skin allergic inflammation in mice maintained on dietary coconut oil.

Numerous studies have suggested the beneficial effects of coconut in the treatment of diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and Alzheimer’s disease, through components including dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, and phenolic compounds.

Here, we show that FAs derived from coconut oil play important roles in the maintenance of health by controlling allergic inflammation in mice; this is consistent with previous reports that topical and dietary coconut oil is beneficial for the prevention and amelioration of dermatitis.

Since there are no essential fatty acids in coconut oil, what did the researchers attribute in the coconut oil as beneficial in reducing allergic skin inflammation?

In terms of FA composition, one of the unique characteristics of coconut oil is the large amount of MCFAs (medium chain fatty acids); these are easy to digest and could potentially contribute to prevention of obesity and diabetes and have demonstrated protective effects against intestinal inflammation and colitis.

Of the medium chain fatty acids found in coconut oil, the most predominate one is lauric acid. Coconut oil is nature’s richest source of lauric acid, making up about 50% of coconut oil, with human breast milk being a distant second.

Apart from the low contents of n-3 and n-6 FAs, coconut oils uniquely are abundantly composed of lauric acid (Figure 2A). Consistently, lauric acid concentration was higher in coconut mice than in soybean mice (Figure 2C), prompting us to examine the probable roles of lauric acid in CHS.

The other component the researchers looked at was mead acid.

Mead acid, a metabolite of oleic acid, has known anti-inflammatory properties. Because mice maintained on coconut oil show EFAD (essential fatty acid deficiency) and body accumulation of mead acid, we compared the abundances of mead acid in the serum of coconut and soybean mice. Mead acid levels were substantially higher in coconut mice.

With the USDA and FDA currently condemning coconut oil as unhealthy due to its high saturated fat content, it is certainly no surprise that allergic skin inflammation diseases are becoming so common in the United States.

If you want healthier skin, cut down on polyunsaturated vegetable oils and switch to coconut oil as a more significant portion of your diet.

Reference

“Dietary coconut oil ameliorates skin contact hypersensitivity through mead acid production in mice” – European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology – 06 March 2019 – Prabha Tiwari, Takahiro Nagatake, So‐ichiro Hirata, Kento Sawane, Azusa Saika, Yuki Shibata, Sakiko Morimoto, Tetsuya Honda, Jun Adachi, Yuichi Abe, Junko Isoyama, Takeshi Tomonaga, Hiroshi Kiyono, Kenji Kabashima, Jun Kunisawa. Abstract.

About the author: Unlike many people who write about coconut oil by simply reading about it, Brian Shilhavy actually lived in a coconut producing area of the Philippines for several years with his family, observing firsthand the differences between the diet and health of the younger generation and those of his wife’s parents’ generation still consuming a traditional diet. This led to years of studying Philippine nutrition and dietary patterns first hand while living in a rural farming community in the Philippines. Brian is the author of the best-selling book: Virgin Coconut Oil: How it has changed people’s lives and how it can change yours!

Includes 85 recipes – Free shipping available!

Read the Virgin Coconut Oil eBook on Your Mobile Device!

 

 

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Continue Reading Study: Dietary Coconut Oil Leads to Healthy Skin – Reduces Skin Infection and Inflammation

Study: Dietary Coconut Oil Leads to Healthy Skin – Reduces Skin Infection and Inflammation

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Structure of Low-density lipoprotein (LDL): apolipoprotein (apo B-100)

by Paul Fassa
Health Impact News

Independently-sourced research challenges the idea that LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is the “bad cholesterol,” and causes heart disease.

However, the theory that LDL is “bad” persists in the mainstream media and with Big Pharma, mainly because they would lose billions of dollars in drugs and treatments to admit the theory lacks merit.

The hypothesis of saturated fat creating artery-clogging cholesterol as the source of heart disease should be considered dead and incapable of resuscitating, based on the scientific evidence.

But one still sees and hears fearful statements about lowering cholesterol and avoiding heart disease, mostly on mainstream media but even all too often on internet alternative media sources. 

Current research is showing LDL is not dangerous and it’s not an accurate marker for pending heart disease. 

An Explanation of Cholesterol and How LDL and HDL are Differentiated   

Mainstream medicine and pharma-funded research maintains that LDL is the cholesterol that causes coronary congestion.

It’s the “bad cholesterol.”

Perhaps because research has discovered people with high HDL (high-density lipoprotein) live longer than those with low HDL, HDL is now considered the “good cholesterol.” 

For the most part, cholesterol is cholesterol and it’s all good for so many hormonal and structural purposes in our bodies. 

Cholesterol is a waxy lipid substance. It doesn’t mix with our watery plasma. It needs to be carried in the blood’s plasma by lipoproteins, tiny protein spheres that carry cholesterol to wherever it’s needed in the body.

Our bodies actually need cholesterol for many hormonal and cell building functions.

Cholesterol is categorized by the density of its lipoprotein carriers. The density is a factor of the ratio of protein to cholesterol in the particles. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are smaller with around 50 percent protein and 20 percent cholesterol.

Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are larger and contain around 25 percent protein and 50 percent cholesterol.

The mainstream claim is that HDL is the “good cholesterol” because it sweeps up the LDL cholesterol from arteries or other unwanted areas and routes it back to the liver where it came from. (Source)

But if the liver generates LDL cholesterol particles that are carried to various organ tissue areas, including the brain and nervous system as needed, why is it called “bad cholesterol?” 

The conventional explanation has been that LDL particles stick to the endothelial cells of inner arterial walls.

Before we explore the veracity of this claim, let’s have a look at how important cholesterol is for our health.

How cholesterol helps keep us at optimum health:

  • It helps to produce cell membranes, which are made of fat.
  • It is a precursor to the manufacturing of hormones, including sex hormones and cortisone.
  • It is the first step in converting the sun’s UVB rays into vitamin D. 
  • It helps to formulate bile acids for digesting fat.
  • It is needed for proper function of serotonin receptors in the brain
  • It is involved with supplying the CoQ10 coenzyme, a vital cellular energy source in muscle tissue especially the heart muscle.
  • It helps form memories in the brain.
  • It is important in maintaining the health of the intestinal wall.
  • It builds and maintains the myelin sheath – a protective fatty tissue wrapping nerve fibers, which when damaged causes MS and other neurological diseases.
  • It is vital toward building brain cells in the brain, which contains 25 percent of your body’s total cholesterol (Source)

It logically follows that by drastically lowering cholesterol with statin drugs, at least some of the listed functions will be impaired leading to some serious side effects such as muscle or tendon tearing, chronic fatigue, mind fog or impaired memory, and even heart attacks. 

Many statin users who had experienced inexplicable side effects recovered completely within a few short weeks after no longer dosing with statins. 

The LDL Theory of Heart Disease is Busted – With an Asterisk

Several independent scientists, physicians, and cardiologists have busted the LDL theory of cholesterol arterial clogging. 

The title below links to an article covering a review study by several international researchers published in September of 2018. Their peer-reviewed published paper rips the LDL theory of heart disease causation to shreds. See:

Experts Review of 107 Scientific Studies: Cholesterol Does Not Cause Heart Disease – Statin Drugs are Useless

Of course, the research is marginalized and the medical old guard attacked the researchers via mainstream media to keep the war against LDL (the bad cholesterol) going and maintain statin drug profits.

Cholesterol fear is maintained now that LDL remains as the cholesterol culprit for heart disease. The mantra to avoid saturated fat and lower cholesterol continues.

The same network of doctors and scientists, The International Network of Cholesterol Skeptics (THINCS) who put together the review above, supplied suggestions of potential causes of heart disease other than cholesterol. See:

Network of Cholesterol Skeptics Researchers: Abandon the LDL Cholesterol Theory of Heart Disease and Look at More Important Risk Factors

The suggestions in the above article are examples of where heart disease research should go now that the lipid theory of heart disease has been ripped to shreds, not only by THINCS members but others as well. 

Dr. Ronald M. Kraus, MD is a co-creator of a device that can sort out VLDL (very low-density lipoprotein), from LDL.

VLDL (very low-density lipoproteins) is the “asterisk” mentioned in the title of this section. It will be covered in the next section after this quote by Dr. Kraus:

Low-fat diets are old news, you say? Try telling that to the makers of, say, Baked Lays. It will take us years to shake off the damage done by broadly implicating fat in the diet. Everybody I know in the field — everybody — recognized that a simple low-fat message was a mistake. 

I spend a lot of time talking to reporters and trying to explain that dietary cholesterol is not the same as blood cholesterol. (Source) 

In other words, the saturated fat causation of heart disease is wrong, but it still lingers enough for the pharmaceutical and processed food industries to profit from this “cholesterol con.” 

Despite this uprising from several in the medical science community, the public perception is still held hostage to the official nutritional and medical dogmatic doctrine of using high LDL as a marker for heart disease. 

The mainstream medical monopoly’s use of mainstream media, which thrives from Big Pharma’s advertising revenue, helps keep the cholesterol con afloat. Behind the mainstream public scenes, those who know better are publicly challenged ad hominem while the details of their findings wind up in mainstream media obscurity. 

A Little on VLDL – Very Low-Density Lipoproteins

These lipoproteins contain minuscule cholesterol levels but are high in triglyceride lipids. Triglyceride lipids form the fat from unused carbohydrate energy, like sugar.

Triglycerides are intended as storage to be utilized for energy when other dietary energy sources wane or the need for more energy arises.

But that very rarely happens in our culture of accessible cheap foods, especially with processed and junk fast foods.

Add “energy drinks” to the mix, and as the body gets overwhelmed with foods that disrupt metabolic processing, the triglyceride fat just keeps accumulating. 

The smaller, heavier VLDL particles can burrow into inner arterial walls and cause inflammation with their oxidation-prone triglycerides.

Guess what tries to patch up that inflammation?

Cholesterol, manufactured and distributed by the liver, aka LDL. Internal tissue repair is one of its functions.

And what’s been discovered and is gradually being accepted everywhere, except for mainstream medicine, government nutritional agencies, and the mainstream media, is that excess sugar, refined carbohydrates, and HFCS (high fructose corn syrup) are the culprits behind obesity, diabetes 2, and coronary artery disease (CAD).

Dr. Robert Lustig, pediatric endocrinologist professor at the University of California, San Francisco, has been on a mission exposing the role sugar and HFCS play with creating heart disease by causing arterial damage with triglyceride fats carried by the VLDL particles. 

Dr. Lustig explains:

So we were using the wrong marker [cholesterol] all along. It turned out the triglyceride was way worse. Triglyceride is basically what your liver does to sugar. And again, sugar was the problem, Yudkin* was right, and the food industry killed him. [* added] (Source)

*Around the time Ancel Keys was claiming fat was the source of heart disease, a British Researcher, Professor John Yudkin, was researching sugar as the source. Yudkin’s research was trashed by the sugar industry to avoid financial loss by scapegoating fat as the source of coronary heart disease. 

The whole statin drug industry, along with the food industry and its processed low-fat foods that would accommodate the low and no fat diet philosophy are shams based on the totally erroneous assumption that cholesterol from dietary saturated fats is the main source of cardiovascular disease. 

Video: Dr. Nadir Ali, MD: The Paradox of Insulin Resistance versus LDL Cholesterol

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Continue Reading Dispelling the Myth that LDL Cholesterol is “Bad”

Dispelling the Myth that LDL Cholesterol is “Bad”

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Coconut Oil Health Benefits Info-graph

by Paul Fassa
Health Impact News

Research outside of the United States continues to show what the world is investigating and learning about coconut oil, while such information is censored in the U.S. corporate “mainstream” media since coconut oil presents a threat to Big Food and Big Pharma’s financial interests.

Recent studies confirm that coconut oil protects the heart, and also potentially protects other vital organs including the liver and kidneys of those suffering from diabetes.

This research contradicts the propaganda against coconut oil by American organizations such as the American Heart Association which still promote the now failed theory of heart disease that blames saturated fats and cholesterol as causative factors in heart disease.

Recent Russian White Paper Explains How Coconut Oil Protects Heart Health

Three Russian researchers collaborated on a “white paper” explaining the health virtues of coconut oil to ameliorate diabetic symptoms and protect cardiovascular disease.

It was published as [Laurine fatty acids, medium fatty acids and triglycerides, hyperlipidemia, resistance to insulin, prevention of atherosclerosis and ateromatosis.] in 2019 by the journal Klinicheskaia laboratornaia diagnostika.

The paper acknowledges the association of low incidences of cardiovascular disease among cultures with high coconut oil consumption.

It details how coconut oil’s high amount of lauric acid is rich with medium chain fatty acids, which can be easily metabolized by the liver to produce ketones for immediate cellular energy in lieu of glucose.

The Russian paper mentions that metabolic improvements among pre-diabetic and diabetic patients are due to the ability of cells to metabolize ketones for energy without needing insulin to escort glucose into the cells.

Usually, various methods of fasting or going on a ketogenic diet are considered the go-to methods of creating enough ketones to bypass metabolic dysfunction. But the Russian researchers offered supplementing with coconut oil as a viable option, stating:

Food enriched with medium-chain TG is optimal for increasing the ketone content in blood plasma, cerebrospinal fluid without limiting the carbohydrate content in food.

The formation of excess ketone bodies by cells can be achieved by activating the metabolic transformations of medium-chain FAs [fatty acids], without fasting and [while] preserving carbohydrates in food.

Coconut oil has a positive effect on the cardiovascular system, preventing the formation of atherosclerosis and atheromatosis. (Source)

Also see:

Coconut Oil and Heart Disease

Animal Study in Serbia Demonstrated How Coconut Oil Protects Vital Organs

Researchers at the University of Belgrade in Serbia teamed up to determine if and to what extent does virgin coconut oil (VCO) protect the heart, liver, and kidneys of diabetic rats from oxidative stress. 

The rats were injected with alloxan, a compound used in animal studies to induce diabetes. According to one definition, alloxan at first creates hyperglycemia with insulin resistance, then by damaging beta cells in the pancreas. 

Whether alloxan induces diabetes 2 first or not, ultimately the beta cell damage does occur producing a diabetes 1 result. (Source) 

The results of this 16-week study were published by the journal Food Function on March 13, 2019, as The protective role of virgin coconut oil on the alloxan-induced oxidative stress in the liver, kidneys, and heart of diabetic rats. 

The diabetic-induced rats that were fed a diet that was 20 percent VCO wound up eating less with a reduction of body mass.

The researchers were able to determine that the virgin coconut oil-consuming diabetic rats benefited from various glutathione activities specific to each of the three organs analyzed to protect them from oxidation. The glutathione molecule is considered the master or mother antioxidant.

It can scavenge free radicals from tissues before damage to the tissue occurs. But then the glutathione molecules are saturated with free radicals that need to be unloaded and sent back out empty enough to absorb more free radicals. This process occurs in the liver. 

According to this research, adding virgin coconut oil to the diet augments various glutathione activities specific to the heart, liver, and kidneys to withstand oxidative stress from diabetic conditions and potentially offer some level of symptom relief.

The varied biochemical results led the researchers to conclude:

The results of canonical* discriminant analysis of oxidative stress parameters revealed that VCO exerts its effects in a tissue-specific manner.

*Canonical in this case means “according to recognized rules or scientific laws.” (Source) 

Virgin coconut oil helped metabolize different aspects of glutathione events according to specific organ tissues involved, implying virgin coconut oil adaptogenic with some target selectivity intelligence. 

What this study’s abstract does not mention is how coconut oil’s medium chain triglycerides create an energy source that replaces glucose, and ketone bodies, which are not insulin related. If your cells are insulin resistant, ketones provide cellular energy without needing insulin to metabolize glucose. 

It’s been observed that diabetes 2 can lead to a pancreatic beta cell burnout from over-creating insulin in an attempt to overcome insulin resistance, thus leading to external insulin dependence or diabetes 1. So this is another way coconut oil can help correct diabetes without side effects. 

Virgin Coconut Oil:
How it has changed people’s lives and how it can change yours!

Includes 85 recipes – Free shipping available!

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Continue Reading Research in 2019 Continues to Show Healing Benefits of Coconut Oil

Research in 2019 Continues to Show Healing Benefits of Coconut Oil

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Every day leading up to National Coconut Day on June 26th we’re making coconut inspired recipes! That means 6 delicious recipes in 3 days! Today’s menu is lunch and breakfast.

Coconut Waffles with Mango

Ingredients needed:

1 cup of flour

2 tablespoons of sugar

1 teaspoon of baking powder

½ teaspoon of baking soda

Salt (to taste)

1 cup of coconut milk

3 tablespoon of Kelapo Coconut Oil (melted)

1 large egg

Kelapo Coconut Oil Non-Sticking Cooking Spray

Mangos (sliced)

To make this dish, grab a large bowl and add the following ingredients: flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Using a whisk, blend all the ingredients together. In a separate bowl, add the Kelapo Coconut Oil, coconut milk and an egg then whisk it all together with the hand mixer. Once the wet ingredients are completely combined, add them to the bowl with the dry ingredients. Heat up your waffle iron before putting in the batter. Grease the waffle iron with Kelapo Coconut Oil Spray and then cook waffles based on waffle iron instructions. Cook until waffles are nice and crispy. Ad whipped cream and maple syrup on top! Serve with mangos for a delicious treat.

Spicy Kale and Coconut Fried Rice

Ingredients needed:

2 tablespoons of Kelapo Coconut Oil

2 eggs (whisked)

2 cloves of garlic (minced)

¾ cup of green onions (chopped)

1 cup of carrots (chopped)

1 medium bunch of kale (ribs removed and leaves chopped)

¼ teaspoon of salt

¾ cup of large unsweetened coconut flakes

2 cups of brown rice (cooked)

2 teaspoons of soy sauce (low sodium)

2 teaspoons of sriracha

1 lime (halved)

1 cup of fresh cilantro

Heat a large (12-inch or wider) wok, cast iron skillet or non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot enough that a drop of water sizzles on contact, add 1 teaspoon oil and swirl the pan to coat the bottom. Pour in the eggs and cook, stirring frequently, until the eggs are scrambled and lightly set. Transfer the eggs to your empty bowl. Wipe out the pan if necessary with a paper towel (be careful, it’s hot!).

Add 1 tablespoon oil to the pan and add the garlic, green onions and optional additional vegetables. Cook until fragrant or until the vegetables are tender, stirring frequently, for 30 seconds or longer. Add the kale and salt. Continue to cook until the kale is wilted and tender, stirring frequently, about 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer the contents of the pan to your bowl of eggs.

Add the remaining 2 teaspoons oil to the pan. Pour in the coconut flakes and cook, stirring frequently, until the flakes are lightly golden, about 30 seconds. Add the rice to the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, until the rice is hot, about 3 minutes.

Pour the contents of the bowl back into the pan, breaking up the scrambled egg with your spatula or spoon. Once warmed, remove the pan from the heat.

Add the tamari, chili garlic sauce and juice of ½ lime. Stir to combine. Taste, and if it’s not fantastic yet, add another teaspoon of tamari or a pinch of salt, as needed.

Slice the remaining ½ lime into wedges, then divide the fried rice into individual bowls. Garnish with wedges of lime and a sprinkling of torn cilantro leaves, with jars of tamari, chili garlic sauce and/or red pepper flakes on the side, for those who might want more.

Peace, love and Kelapo

-Gabriella

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We’re Coconuts for Coconut Day!