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EverythingProduct SearchIt is never ever far too late to get in shape and reduce weight,…

Continue Reading 9 Healthy Meal Recipes That Help You Lose Belly Fat

9 Healthy Meal Recipes That Help You Lose Belly Fat

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EverythingProduct SearchThe humble cabbage is an economically important plant with European origins. While eaten all…

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How to Cook Cabbage

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EverythingProduct Search There are few things better than the aroma of someone peeling an orange….

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13 Outstanding Benefits of Orange Essential Oil

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EverythingProduct Search It’s clear that coconut oil is extremely popular today, and for great factor.& …

Continue Reading 8 Clever uses for coconut oil (that are almost too good to be true)

8 Clever uses for coconut oil (that are almost too good to be true)

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EverythingProduct SearchCerumen, likewise referred to as earwax, is essential for the health of your ear….

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How to clean your ears without a cotton swab

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EverythingProduct SearchCan You Have Bread on Keto? And Should You? 20 Insanely Delicious Keto Bread…

Continue Reading The Best Keto Bread Recipes: 30 Recipes You Won’t Believe are Low-Carb

The Best Keto Bread Recipes: 30 Recipes You Won’t Believe are Low-Carb

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Here is a link to a very thorough and highly researched article by Dr. Stephanie Seneff of MIT discussing the importance of fat and cholesterol, how they work in the brain, why statin use may be counterproductive for people at risk for and dealing with Alzheimer’s, the function of beta amyloid and why a high fat diet may be beneficial.  I found this especially enlightening in its explanation of how cholesterol is packaged as it is transported throughout the body, and what it is packaged with in LDL particles, for example, may be a surprise.

http://coconutoil.com/the-clue-to-why-low-fat-diet-and-statins-may-cause-alzheimers/

Dr. Seneff has written many other similar articles of great interest to those concerned with cholesterol, statins, Alzheimer’s, autism and other neurodegenerative diseases, many of which can be downloaded from her homepage.  http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/

Continue Reading Dr. Stephanie Seneff of MIT on Cholesterol, ApoE4, Statins, Beta Amyloid and Alzheimer’s

Dr. Stephanie Seneff of MIT on Cholesterol, ApoE4, Statins, Beta Amyloid and Alzheimer’s

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Spa model girl holding coconut and smiling.

by Brian Shilhavy
Editor, Health Impact News

A new study out of Japan and published in the European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology shows how switching the dietary oil of chow fed to mice from soybean oil to coconut oil reduced skin inflammation.

The skin healing properties of coconut oil, especially virgin coconut oil, applied topically to the skin have been known for a long time.

When we first started importing virgin coconut oil from the Philippines to the U.S. market in 2001, and had started an online discussion group, some of the most powerful testimonies we started receiving from people were how they were using virgin coconut oil for their skin conditions.

Even though coconut oil is sold as a dietary oil, people started applying it topically and seeing tremendous results for their skin conditions such as acne, eczema, keratosis polaris, psoriasis, rosacea, and fungal infections. Read some of these incredible testimonies here:

Virgin Coconut Oil for Skin Health

We have suspected for years that the reason people in tropical climates who eat their traditional diets which are high in the saturated fats of coconut oil had such beautiful skin, even though they are exposed to the sun to a greater degree than westerners, is because of the high amounts of coconut oil in their diet, which does not oxidize and cause free radical damage as polyunsaturated fats do.

Skin cancer, for example, is almost unheard of in tropical climates like the Philippines, but common in western nations, even in colder climates with far less exposure to the sun.

Researchers in Japan apparently wanted to test this theory of dietary coconut oil reducing allergic skin inflammation in the laboratory:

Coconut oil is used as a dietary oil worldwide, and its healthy effects are recognized by the fact that coconut oil is easy to digest, helps in weight management, increases healthy cholesterol and provides instant energy.

Although topical application of coconut oil is known to reduce skin infection and inflammation, whether dietary coconut oil has any role in decreasing skin inflammation is unknown.

In this study, we showed the impact of dietary coconut oil in allergic skin inflammation by using a mouse model of contact hypersensitivity (CHS).

So they replaced the soybean oil commonly used in mice chow with coconut oil.

Soybean oil has been the most common dietary oil in the western diet since World War II, when expeller-pressed seed technology allowed manufactures to extract oil from the soybean, one of the main cash crops in the U.S. and heavily subsidized to dominate the world market in dietary oils.

Soybean oil is high in Omega 6 fatty acids, and it is commonly known that most westerners have an unhealthy balance of Omega 3 to Omega 6 fatty acids leading to various health problems, as most westerners need more Omega 3 fatty acids and far less Omega 6 fatty acids in their diet.

This point was noted by the researchers:

A high n-6/n-3 FA ratio is linked to many chronic inflammatory diseases, including cardiovascular disease, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and inflammatory bowel disease.

Coconut oil does not contain appreciable amounts of either of these classes (Omega 3 or Omega 6) of essential fatty acids.

Previous studies using dietary coconut oil have shown its health benefits toward hepatotoxicity, together with altered lipid profiles in the body.

Another unique feature of coconut oil is the low abundance of both n-3 and n-6 essential FAs.

Omega 3 fatty acids are linked to anti-inflammatory effects, and since coconut oil does not contain any appreciable amount of Omega 3s, they could not be attributed to lower allergic inflammation in the skin with the mice fed the coconut oil diet.

After 2 months of comparing the mice on the standard soybean oil chow and the ones with coconut oil, they found that there was:

Amelioration of skin allergic inflammation in mice maintained on dietary coconut oil.

Numerous studies have suggested the beneficial effects of coconut in the treatment of diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and Alzheimer’s disease, through components including dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, and phenolic compounds.

Here, we show that FAs derived from coconut oil play important roles in the maintenance of health by controlling allergic inflammation in mice; this is consistent with previous reports that topical and dietary coconut oil is beneficial for the prevention and amelioration of dermatitis.

Since there are no essential fatty acids in coconut oil, what did the researchers attribute in the coconut oil as beneficial in reducing allergic skin inflammation?

In terms of FA composition, one of the unique characteristics of coconut oil is the large amount of MCFAs (medium chain fatty acids); these are easy to digest and could potentially contribute to prevention of obesity and diabetes and have demonstrated protective effects against intestinal inflammation and colitis.

Of the medium chain fatty acids found in coconut oil, the most predominate one is lauric acid. Coconut oil is nature’s richest source of lauric acid, making up about 50% of coconut oil, with human breast milk being a distant second.

Apart from the low contents of n-3 and n-6 FAs, coconut oils uniquely are abundantly composed of lauric acid (Figure 2A). Consistently, lauric acid concentration was higher in coconut mice than in soybean mice (Figure 2C), prompting us to examine the probable roles of lauric acid in CHS.

The other component the researchers looked at was mead acid.

Mead acid, a metabolite of oleic acid, has known anti-inflammatory properties. Because mice maintained on coconut oil show EFAD (essential fatty acid deficiency) and body accumulation of mead acid, we compared the abundances of mead acid in the serum of coconut and soybean mice. Mead acid levels were substantially higher in coconut mice.

With the USDA and FDA currently condemning coconut oil as unhealthy due to its high saturated fat content, it is certainly no surprise that allergic skin inflammation diseases are becoming so common in the United States.

If you want healthier skin, cut down on polyunsaturated vegetable oils and switch to coconut oil as a more significant portion of your diet.

Reference

“Dietary coconut oil ameliorates skin contact hypersensitivity through mead acid production in mice” – European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology – 06 March 2019 – Prabha Tiwari, Takahiro Nagatake, So‐ichiro Hirata, Kento Sawane, Azusa Saika, Yuki Shibata, Sakiko Morimoto, Tetsuya Honda, Jun Adachi, Yuichi Abe, Junko Isoyama, Takeshi Tomonaga, Hiroshi Kiyono, Kenji Kabashima, Jun Kunisawa. Abstract.

About the author: Unlike many people who write about coconut oil by simply reading about it, Brian Shilhavy actually lived in a coconut producing area of the Philippines for several years with his family, observing firsthand the differences between the diet and health of the younger generation and those of his wife’s parents’ generation still consuming a traditional diet. This led to years of studying Philippine nutrition and dietary patterns first hand while living in a rural farming community in the Philippines. Brian is the author of the best-selling book: Virgin Coconut Oil: How it has changed people’s lives and how it can change yours!

Includes 85 recipes – Free shipping available!

Read the Virgin Coconut Oil eBook on Your Mobile Device!

 

 

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Continue Reading Study: Dietary Coconut Oil Leads to Healthy Skin – Reduces Skin Infection and Inflammation

Study: Dietary Coconut Oil Leads to Healthy Skin – Reduces Skin Infection and Inflammation

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There is a tiny worm that may tell us a big story about ketones. Called Caenorhabditis elegans, or C. elegans for short, this is a transparent free-living nematode (roundworm) less than 1/8 inch long (1 mm) that moves like a snake. The worm lives only about 2 to 3 weeks and emits a blue fluorescence when it dies.  It is one of the simplest organisms that has a nervous system, consisting of 302 neurons (brain cells) and has been used extensively since 1963 in medical research.  Every type of cell in this worm has been thoroughly studied and its entire genome has been mapped out.  C.elegans is a regular passenger on space flights and on the space station and actually survived the space shuttle Columbia disaster in 2003.  It has been used to study conditions like nicotine addiction, effects of zero gravity on muscle atrophy, sleep and aging. 
            
So, what does this have to do with ketones?  A recent research study using C.elegans strongly suggests that ketones extend lifespan and have anti-aging effects.  As we age, our cells deteriorate, often leading to chronic medical conditions and brain diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Dietary restriction of calories slows the process of aging down and increases the lifespan of many organisms including primates and C.elegans. Dietary restriction is known to increase ketone levels and this could at least partly explain its effects on prolonging life.  Researchers in the anti-aging field look for substances that mimic dietary restriction and lead to longer lifespan and delay the onset of diseases of aging.  It turns out that the ketone betahydroxybutyrate, found in ketone salts (marketed by the Pruvit company), is one of those anti-aging substances. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) found in coconut oil, palm kernel oil and MCT oil, partly convert to betahydroxybutyrate as well.
            
In 2015, researchers at the University of South Florida published their study in which they found that high levels of D-betahydroxybutyrate extended the lifespan of C.elegans by 26% and that this effect was likely due, at least in part, to suppressing certain enzymes involved in inflammation and damage from reactive oxygen species. They then studied the effects of betahydroxybutyrate on models of the worm that were engineered to represent Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.  They further found that betahydroxybutyrate delayed the onset of signs of Alzheimer’s in the worm by 15% and also delayed the formation of clumps of the abnormal protein found in Parkinson’s disease by 35%.    The bottom line here is that betahydroxybutyrate prolonged the lifespan and was found to protect brain cells in the worm.
            
In an article published in 2017, Dr. Richard L. Veech and his associates at the National Institutes of Health further explain how these findings in C.elegans might be translated to prolonging human lifespan and delaying effects of aging on the brain.  The likely ketone effects involved include anti-inflammatory effects, reduction of damage from reactive oxygen species, and reducing levels of glucose and insulin.  My summary here is just a simple explanation for the very technical, complicated biochemistry involved.
            
We gigantic humans share many of the same chemical pathways as C. elegans, including those studied in the University of South Florida experiments. Do ketones have anti-aging effects?  Based on the latest information from studying this little worm, the answer to this question appears to be yes!
References:

Edwards C, J Canfield, N Copes, et al. D-beta-hydroxybutyrate extends lifespan in C. elegans. Aging Vol. 6 No. 8 (2014):1-24.
Edwards C, N Copes, PC Bradshaw. D-beta-hydroxybutyrate: an anti-aging ketone body. Oncotarget Vol. 6 No. 6 (2015): 3477-8.

Veech RL, PC Bradshaw, K Clarke, et al. Ketone bodies mimic the life span extending properties of caloric restriction. IUBMB Life Vol. 69 No. 5 (2017):305-314.

Continue Reading DO KETONES HAVE ANTI-AGING EFFECTS?

DO KETONES HAVE ANTI-AGING EFFECTS?

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White pill box with coconut oil concept.

by Paul Fassa
Health Impact News

Headlines in the corporate-sponsored “mainstream” media this past week warned the public about a new “mysterious infection” that is drug-resistant.

As a recent NY Times Health Section article reported, there is allegedly a hospital cover-up of an emerging candida fungus, Candida or C. auris.

It is the latest antimicrobial drug-resistant “super-bug” to emerge in hospitals and nursing homes. This time it’s not about bacteria, it’s a virulent form of Candida.

And while the corporate media, sponsored in a large degree by Big Pharma, will almost never report on natural solutions, there is hope for fighting fungal infections like Candida where drugs have failed.

One of the most beneficial natural products that fights and kills strains of Candida, according to peer-reviewed research over the past several years, is coconut oil.

A Major Factor That Has Contributed to Candida Overgrowth and C. Auris

It seems there are many who can carry this fungus on their skin without ill effects as long as it doesn’t get into the bloodstream. 

Candida auris manages to develop and remain on any material. So an asymptomatic human carrier can bring this fungus into a hospital room where it can prey on the elderly and ill who have to stay for any length of time.

So far, this hospital-borne, antifungal drug-resistant C. auris is not threatening populations outside of hospitals and nursing homes where the more vulnerable elderly and sick live day to day. 

Most of the Candida auris infections occurred in a few hospitals in England, Spain, parts of Asia, and now in the USA. But nearly half of the several hundred immunocompromised elderly and sick infected with C. auris have died. (Source)

The overuse of pharmaceutical antibiotics has led to a crisis of antibiotic, drug-resistant super-bugs. It’s known that a majority of pharma antibiotics are used on factory farm livestock as a pre-slaughter fattener and to protect them against the diseases from overcrowded, unnatural feeding conditions called CAFOs (concentrated animal feeding operations).  

Enough antibiotics wind up in our food chain to create a tipping point for those who subsist on the Standard American Diet (SAD) which includes factory farm meat and dairy products retaining some levels of those antibiotics. Add this to overly-prescribed antibiotics.

What happens is pathogenic microbes mutate and develop resistance over time to those drugs. Perhaps it’s more a case of that antimicrobial drug no longer being able to identify its target. 

Natural microbes can figure out how to avoid synthetic chemicals imposed on them. They have an ample supply of pharmaceutical antibiotic drugs to practice survival with. Apparently, pathogens haven’t grasped how to outsmart natural antimicrobial agents such as colloidal silver and coconut oil.

Perhaps even more importantly, those antibiotics harm and reduce the “good” bacteria in our microbiomes that serve and protect us. They wind up making us more vulnerable to infectious diseases or contribute toward auto-immune diseases, which are more on the rise than infectious diseases. (Source)

Most Candida overgrowth sufferers have had a history of antibiotic use. Candida yeast cells comprise a minority of our microbiome population. Normally, they’re kept in check by the majority of our beneficial bacteria. 

But if antibiotics are used enough to significantly deplete the beneficial bacteria, those candida cells rapidly rise to overwhelm the microbiome balance and create a candida overgrowth. 

Ironically, the overuse of antibiotics has also led to the rise of candida overgrowth known as Candida albicans, or yeast infections, and now this new antifungal-resistant Candida auris. See:

Pharmaceutical Antibiotic Drugs: Life Saver or Life Destroyer?

Antifungal drugs are not as commonly used for humans and animals as antibiotics. But two of the scientists interviewed in the NY Times article claim antifungal crop-spraying has been the major contributor toward creating this new antifungal drug resistance. (Source)

A 2013 study, Emergence of Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus Strains due to Agricultural Azole Use Creates an Increasing Threat to Human Health, carefully examined this situation.  Azole-based fungicides are commonly used in agriculture.

Attempts at creating cocktails of existing antifungal drugs have proven to have little effect on Candida auris. Even if somewhat effective, antifungal drugs are packaged with some potentially nasty side effects. 

What Coconut Oil Can Do for Candida Overgrowth

Coconut oil’s natural antifungal efficacy offers additional health benefits instead of adverse side effects. This is the prophylactic dynamic and part of the potential healing solution to this hyped-up candida danger. 

Yet, there was no mention of this by the CDC or media regarding the sudden appearance of antifungal resistant Candida auris. Part of this is due to the official dogma of the cholesterol theory of heart disease, diabetes, and obesity over the past 50 plus years which has been proven false. 

And coconut oil has been demonized as an unhealthy saturated fat.

But the saturated fat/cholesterol theory of heart disease, diabetes, and obesity is simply a false dogma based on faulty science, enforced by government and non-government agencies and bolstered by the processed low-fat food industry and promoted by mainstream media. There was a media exception. See:

Time Magazine: We Were Wrong About Saturated Fats

There have been many studies done on coconut oil and its beneficial fatty acids, mostly in other nations, that haven’t been given any mainstream media exposure in the U.S. The most potent beneficial fatty acids in coconut oil fighting candida overgrowth are: 

  • Caproic Acid
  • Caprylic Acid
  • Capric Acid
  • Lauric Acid 

A 2012 study in Japan, [Inhibition of Candida mycelia growth by a medium chain fatty acids, capric acid in vitro and its therapeutic efficacy in murine oral candidiasis]found all four fatty acids have pronounced antiseptic properties on candida fungi. 

A Nigerian study in 2007, In vitro antimicrobial properties of coconut oil on Candida species in Ibadan, Nigeria, analyzed the antifungal properties of coconut oil compared to the pharmaceutical antifungal drug fluconazole, concluding:

Coconut oil should be used in the treatment of fungal infections in view of emerging drug-resistant Candida species. (Source)

Anecdotal successes with coconut oil have been reported at coconutoil.com. One person wrote: 

It’s been 5 years that I have really been struggling with this (though the imbalance was established long before that).  I read that taking …..Virgin Coconut Oil could help with a candida imbalance and it really has. (Source)

Another testified: 

I’ve been battling a systemic candida yeast infection for over ten years. I have the mutated (fungal) stage and it’s the toughest thing I’ve ever had to deal with. … there are no phamaceuticals for it that are effective.

Candida yeast can overgrow in the gut under the right conditions until it mutates and becomes an invading pathogen, moves out of the gut and grows in mass in any part of the body.

When it affects a vital organ, then it can be deadly.

I’ve tried everything from conventional drugs to all the natural remedies … but have never experienced the “die-off effect,” or Herxheimer Reaction … symptoms generated by a detoxification process.

[This oil] is something I will not be without for the rest of my life. (Source)

More Studies on Coconut Oil for Fungal Yeast Infections 

The efficacy of coconut oil for yeast infection suppression was tested at Tufts University in Massachusetts in 2015. 

The study report advised looking more into coconut oil as a medical treatment for candida overgrowth issues to reduce writing prescriptions for antifungals. 

Lead study author Kearney Gunsalus, PhD, explained:

The potential use of coconut oil in the short term to control the rate of fungal overgrowth should not be considered a prophylactic approach to preventing fungal infections.

We want to give clinicians a treatment option that might limit the need for antifungal drugs.

If we can use coconut oil as a safe, dietary alternative, we could decrease the amount of antifungal drugs used, reserving antifungal drugs for critical situations. (Source)

An earlier study examined caprylic acid, which is one of four fatty acids contained in coconut oil that are effective against candida overgrowth. It compared the results of caprylic acid with Diflucan, a pharmaceutical antifungal drug, concluding: 

Caprylic acid is superior to & less expensive than Diflucan, [a pharmaceutical antifungal] & has potential application for anti-cancer, anti-aging, anti-Alzheimer’s disease, anti-Autism, anti-infection, & general circulatory improvement. (Source)

That’s quite a lot of medicinal power for only one of the four beneficial, easily-digested, medium chain fatty acids contained in coconut oil.

Dietary Assistance to Support Coconut Oil Efficacy

Many holistic doctors consider coconut oil as the “pesticide” part of a healing protocol involving a proper diet to support a gut microbiome population balance. 

The dietary discipline usually involves greatly reducing sugar and refined carbohydrate intake and avoiding processed vegetable oils and margarine with trans-fatty acids and packaged foods with preservatives and MSG. 

For most Candida sufferers, 3.5 tablespoons of virgin coconut oil daily may provide a sufficient pesticide for reducing candida growth to healthy gut microbiome parameters. But it should be supported by a proper diet. A ketogenic high fat low carb diet is an effective dietary solution. 

At the very least, one should at least greatly minimize sugars and other simple or refined carbs that candida thrive on. Don’t fall for the artificial sweetener “solution” either. They are as bad or worse than sugars and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). 

Replace convenient processed foods with high quality, pure, whole foods, and don’t use microwave ovens for cooking or warming foods or liquids.

Add probiotic fermented foods to your daily food consumption to bolster the friendly benign bacteria’s population in your gut microbiome. It’s best to make your own milk or water kefir. You can order “starter grains” with instructions for making these kefirs online.

Prebiotic foods are what probiotic (friendly or good bacteria) thrive on. Surprisingly, starchy foods once cooked then cooled and consumed cold provide a prebiotic foundation to help support your probiotic bacteria. 

Using only organic whole grains or potatoes is recommended by food and nutrition experts as the starchy foods to create this “resistant starch,” meaning it resists being broken down into glucose. Instead, it forms into a food source for probiotic bacteria. See:

Study: Candida Infections Can Be Controlled with Coconut Oil

 

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Virgin Coconut Oil:
How it has changed people’s lives and how it can change yours!

Includes 85 recipes – Free shipping available!

Continue Reading As Pharma Anti-fungal Drugs Fail, Is Coconut Oil Best Defense for New Deadly “Mystery Infection?”

As Pharma Anti-fungal Drugs Fail, Is Coconut Oil Best Defense for New Deadly “Mystery Infection?”