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EverythingProduct SearchKeto Pound Cake Recipe INGREDIENTS 1 1/2 Cup (125g) Super Fine Almond Flour Heaping 1/2…

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Keto Pound Cake

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EverythingProduct Search This  Purple cabbage and potato soup  happened because of 3 reasons. First, I…

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Purple cabbage and potato soup + A Little Life Book Review

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EverythingProduct SearchAcne commonly develops on a person’s forehead, although it can also occur in various…

Continue Reading How to Get Rid of Forehead Acne, According to 11 Experts

How to Get Rid of Forehead Acne, According to 11 Experts

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EverythingProduct SearchIf you’’ ve been yearning smoky chicken satay slathered in a velvety peanut sauce…

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Chicken Satay

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EverythingProduct SearchCan You Have Bread on Keto? And Should You? 20 Insanely Delicious Keto Bread…

Continue Reading The Best Keto Bread Recipes: 30 Recipes You Won’t Believe are Low-Carb

The Best Keto Bread Recipes: 30 Recipes You Won’t Believe are Low-Carb

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I’ve posted this recipe before, but it’s worth posting again. This is one of my favorite low carb, gluten free cookie recipes. Imagine, you can snack on something good for you that actually helps you lose weight!

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups unsweetened dried coconut
1/2 cup almond meal (finely ground almonds)
2 t. coconut flour
4 T. warm water
4 T. raw honey
2 eggs, beaten
1 t. vanilla
1/4 t. sea salt

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Grease a cookie sheet with coconut oil.

Stir the warm water and honey together. Add the vanilla, eggs, salt, almond meal, coconut flour and coconut. Mix well. If the mixture is runny, let it sit for a few minutes so the coconut can rehydrate. If it is still runny, add another teaspoon of coconut flour. Drop by rounded tablespoons full onto the cookie sheet, about 1 inch apart. Bake for 12 – 15 minutes. The outside of the cookie should be golden brown, while the inside is soft.

Makes about 24 cookies.

If you don’t like the taste of almonds or you want your macaroons whiter, just substitute another 1/2 cup dried coconut for the almond meal.

If you want to get decadent, dip the bottoms of the finished macaroons into melted extra dark chocolate chips mixed with a little coconut oil. Refrigerate.

• • • • •

Learn the secrets thousands are using to lose weight and get healthier with coconut oil diets. Visit our site at http://coconut-oil-diet.com and start losing weight today!

Continue Reading Dianne’s Healthy Coconut Almond Macaroons

Dianne’s Healthy Coconut Almond Macaroons

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Structure of Low-density lipoprotein (LDL): apolipoprotein (apo B-100)

by Paul Fassa
Health Impact News

Independently-sourced research challenges the idea that LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is the “bad cholesterol,” and causes heart disease.

However, the theory that LDL is “bad” persists in the mainstream media and with Big Pharma, mainly because they would lose billions of dollars in drugs and treatments to admit the theory lacks merit.

The hypothesis of saturated fat creating artery-clogging cholesterol as the source of heart disease should be considered dead and incapable of resuscitating, based on the scientific evidence.

But one still sees and hears fearful statements about lowering cholesterol and avoiding heart disease, mostly on mainstream media but even all too often on internet alternative media sources. 

Current research is showing LDL is not dangerous and it’s not an accurate marker for pending heart disease. 

An Explanation of Cholesterol and How LDL and HDL are Differentiated   

Mainstream medicine and pharma-funded research maintains that LDL is the cholesterol that causes coronary congestion.

It’s the “bad cholesterol.”

Perhaps because research has discovered people with high HDL (high-density lipoprotein) live longer than those with low HDL, HDL is now considered the “good cholesterol.” 

For the most part, cholesterol is cholesterol and it’s all good for so many hormonal and structural purposes in our bodies. 

Cholesterol is a waxy lipid substance. It doesn’t mix with our watery plasma. It needs to be carried in the blood’s plasma by lipoproteins, tiny protein spheres that carry cholesterol to wherever it’s needed in the body.

Our bodies actually need cholesterol for many hormonal and cell building functions.

Cholesterol is categorized by the density of its lipoprotein carriers. The density is a factor of the ratio of protein to cholesterol in the particles. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are smaller with around 50 percent protein and 20 percent cholesterol.

Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are larger and contain around 25 percent protein and 50 percent cholesterol.

The mainstream claim is that HDL is the “good cholesterol” because it sweeps up the LDL cholesterol from arteries or other unwanted areas and routes it back to the liver where it came from. (Source)

But if the liver generates LDL cholesterol particles that are carried to various organ tissue areas, including the brain and nervous system as needed, why is it called “bad cholesterol?” 

The conventional explanation has been that LDL particles stick to the endothelial cells of inner arterial walls.

Before we explore the veracity of this claim, let’s have a look at how important cholesterol is for our health.

How cholesterol helps keep us at optimum health:

  • It helps to produce cell membranes, which are made of fat.
  • It is a precursor to the manufacturing of hormones, including sex hormones and cortisone.
  • It is the first step in converting the sun’s UVB rays into vitamin D. 
  • It helps to formulate bile acids for digesting fat.
  • It is needed for proper function of serotonin receptors in the brain
  • It is involved with supplying the CoQ10 coenzyme, a vital cellular energy source in muscle tissue especially the heart muscle.
  • It helps form memories in the brain.
  • It is important in maintaining the health of the intestinal wall.
  • It builds and maintains the myelin sheath – a protective fatty tissue wrapping nerve fibers, which when damaged causes MS and other neurological diseases.
  • It is vital toward building brain cells in the brain, which contains 25 percent of your body’s total cholesterol (Source)

It logically follows that by drastically lowering cholesterol with statin drugs, at least some of the listed functions will be impaired leading to some serious side effects such as muscle or tendon tearing, chronic fatigue, mind fog or impaired memory, and even heart attacks. 

Many statin users who had experienced inexplicable side effects recovered completely within a few short weeks after no longer dosing with statins. 

The LDL Theory of Heart Disease is Busted – With an Asterisk

Several independent scientists, physicians, and cardiologists have busted the LDL theory of cholesterol arterial clogging. 

The title below links to an article covering a review study by several international researchers published in September of 2018. Their peer-reviewed published paper rips the LDL theory of heart disease causation to shreds. See:

Experts Review of 107 Scientific Studies: Cholesterol Does Not Cause Heart Disease – Statin Drugs are Useless

Of course, the research is marginalized and the medical old guard attacked the researchers via mainstream media to keep the war against LDL (the bad cholesterol) going and maintain statin drug profits.

Cholesterol fear is maintained now that LDL remains as the cholesterol culprit for heart disease. The mantra to avoid saturated fat and lower cholesterol continues.

The same network of doctors and scientists, The International Network of Cholesterol Skeptics (THINCS) who put together the review above, supplied suggestions of potential causes of heart disease other than cholesterol. See:

Network of Cholesterol Skeptics Researchers: Abandon the LDL Cholesterol Theory of Heart Disease and Look at More Important Risk Factors

The suggestions in the above article are examples of where heart disease research should go now that the lipid theory of heart disease has been ripped to shreds, not only by THINCS members but others as well. 

Dr. Ronald M. Kraus, MD is a co-creator of a device that can sort out VLDL (very low-density lipoprotein), from LDL.

VLDL (very low-density lipoproteins) is the “asterisk” mentioned in the title of this section. It will be covered in the next section after this quote by Dr. Kraus:

Low-fat diets are old news, you say? Try telling that to the makers of, say, Baked Lays. It will take us years to shake off the damage done by broadly implicating fat in the diet. Everybody I know in the field — everybody — recognized that a simple low-fat message was a mistake. 

I spend a lot of time talking to reporters and trying to explain that dietary cholesterol is not the same as blood cholesterol. (Source) 

In other words, the saturated fat causation of heart disease is wrong, but it still lingers enough for the pharmaceutical and processed food industries to profit from this “cholesterol con.” 

Despite this uprising from several in the medical science community, the public perception is still held hostage to the official nutritional and medical dogmatic doctrine of using high LDL as a marker for heart disease. 

The mainstream medical monopoly’s use of mainstream media, which thrives from Big Pharma’s advertising revenue, helps keep the cholesterol con afloat. Behind the mainstream public scenes, those who know better are publicly challenged ad hominem while the details of their findings wind up in mainstream media obscurity. 

A Little on VLDL – Very Low-Density Lipoproteins

These lipoproteins contain minuscule cholesterol levels but are high in triglyceride lipids. Triglyceride lipids form the fat from unused carbohydrate energy, like sugar.

Triglycerides are intended as storage to be utilized for energy when other dietary energy sources wane or the need for more energy arises.

But that very rarely happens in our culture of accessible cheap foods, especially with processed and junk fast foods.

Add “energy drinks” to the mix, and as the body gets overwhelmed with foods that disrupt metabolic processing, the triglyceride fat just keeps accumulating. 

The smaller, heavier VLDL particles can burrow into inner arterial walls and cause inflammation with their oxidation-prone triglycerides.

Guess what tries to patch up that inflammation?

Cholesterol, manufactured and distributed by the liver, aka LDL. Internal tissue repair is one of its functions.

And what’s been discovered and is gradually being accepted everywhere, except for mainstream medicine, government nutritional agencies, and the mainstream media, is that excess sugar, refined carbohydrates, and HFCS (high fructose corn syrup) are the culprits behind obesity, diabetes 2, and coronary artery disease (CAD).

Dr. Robert Lustig, pediatric endocrinologist professor at the University of California, San Francisco, has been on a mission exposing the role sugar and HFCS play with creating heart disease by causing arterial damage with triglyceride fats carried by the VLDL particles. 

Dr. Lustig explains:

So we were using the wrong marker [cholesterol] all along. It turned out the triglyceride was way worse. Triglyceride is basically what your liver does to sugar. And again, sugar was the problem, Yudkin* was right, and the food industry killed him. [* added] (Source)

*Around the time Ancel Keys was claiming fat was the source of heart disease, a British Researcher, Professor John Yudkin, was researching sugar as the source. Yudkin’s research was trashed by the sugar industry to avoid financial loss by scapegoating fat as the source of coronary heart disease. 

The whole statin drug industry, along with the food industry and its processed low-fat foods that would accommodate the low and no fat diet philosophy are shams based on the totally erroneous assumption that cholesterol from dietary saturated fats is the main source of cardiovascular disease. 

Video: Dr. Nadir Ali, MD: The Paradox of Insulin Resistance versus LDL Cholesterol

Comment on this article at HealthImpactNews.com.

Continue Reading Dispelling the Myth that LDL Cholesterol is “Bad”

Dispelling the Myth that LDL Cholesterol is “Bad”

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  • 2-3 lbs. fresh organic spinach
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1/4 cup crushed blanched almonds, cashews or pine nuts
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon seeded and crushed dried red chili pepper (optional)
  • 1 Tablespoon of unsweetened coconut, lightly toasted.

Place spinach in covered pot, with just enough water to cling to leaves. Cook just until spinach is wilted and tender. Set aside. 

Saute minced onion in butter. Stir in coconut milk, nuts, salt and chili pepper. Add to spinach. Reheat and serve in heated bowl. Top with toasted coconut.

This recipe is especially good if you are on a coconut oil diet! If you want to learn more about how to lose weight with coconut oil, check out my website at http://coconut-oil-diet.com.

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Coconut Spinach

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AWAKENING FROM ALZHEIMER’S INTERNET SERIES (FREE) CONTINUES THROUGH October 2 and all episodes will be repeated from October 6 through October 8, 2017 (free)
Dr. Mary Newport is one of the speakers for this event. Other speakers include Dr. Dominic D’Agostino and Dr. Angela Poff from University of South Florida ketone labs, and Dr. Dale Bredesen who recently published is protocol that has put people with Alzheimer’s back to work in The End of Alzheimer’s…and many other outstanding speakers.
12 days, 14 doctors, 1 purpose…
Watch as the world’s leading experts in Alzheimer’s and dementia share their most effective breakthroughs and discoveries after decades of grueling research in this groundbreaking series.
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Watch the Series Trailer – Get a sneak peek at this exclusive 12-day web series. All episodes will be repeated for free October 6 through 8, 2017.
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Continue Reading AWAKENING FROM ALZHEIMER’S FINAL DAYS – BUT FREE REPEAT OCT 6 THROUGH 8, 2017

AWAKENING FROM ALZHEIMER’S FINAL DAYS – BUT FREE REPEAT OCT 6 THROUGH 8, 2017

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Every day leading up to National Coconut Day on June 26th we’re making coconut inspired recipes! That means 6 delicious recipes in 3 days! Today’s menu is lunch and breakfast.

Coconut Waffles with Mango

Ingredients needed:

1 cup of flour

2 tablespoons of sugar

1 teaspoon of baking powder

½ teaspoon of baking soda

Salt (to taste)

1 cup of coconut milk

3 tablespoon of Kelapo Coconut Oil (melted)

1 large egg

Kelapo Coconut Oil Non-Sticking Cooking Spray

Mangos (sliced)

To make this dish, grab a large bowl and add the following ingredients: flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Using a whisk, blend all the ingredients together. In a separate bowl, add the Kelapo Coconut Oil, coconut milk and an egg then whisk it all together with the hand mixer. Once the wet ingredients are completely combined, add them to the bowl with the dry ingredients. Heat up your waffle iron before putting in the batter. Grease the waffle iron with Kelapo Coconut Oil Spray and then cook waffles based on waffle iron instructions. Cook until waffles are nice and crispy. Ad whipped cream and maple syrup on top! Serve with mangos for a delicious treat.

Spicy Kale and Coconut Fried Rice

Ingredients needed:

2 tablespoons of Kelapo Coconut Oil

2 eggs (whisked)

2 cloves of garlic (minced)

¾ cup of green onions (chopped)

1 cup of carrots (chopped)

1 medium bunch of kale (ribs removed and leaves chopped)

¼ teaspoon of salt

¾ cup of large unsweetened coconut flakes

2 cups of brown rice (cooked)

2 teaspoons of soy sauce (low sodium)

2 teaspoons of sriracha

1 lime (halved)

1 cup of fresh cilantro

Heat a large (12-inch or wider) wok, cast iron skillet or non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot enough that a drop of water sizzles on contact, add 1 teaspoon oil and swirl the pan to coat the bottom. Pour in the eggs and cook, stirring frequently, until the eggs are scrambled and lightly set. Transfer the eggs to your empty bowl. Wipe out the pan if necessary with a paper towel (be careful, it’s hot!).

Add 1 tablespoon oil to the pan and add the garlic, green onions and optional additional vegetables. Cook until fragrant or until the vegetables are tender, stirring frequently, for 30 seconds or longer. Add the kale and salt. Continue to cook until the kale is wilted and tender, stirring frequently, about 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer the contents of the pan to your bowl of eggs.

Add the remaining 2 teaspoons oil to the pan. Pour in the coconut flakes and cook, stirring frequently, until the flakes are lightly golden, about 30 seconds. Add the rice to the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, until the rice is hot, about 3 minutes.

Pour the contents of the bowl back into the pan, breaking up the scrambled egg with your spatula or spoon. Once warmed, remove the pan from the heat.

Add the tamari, chili garlic sauce and juice of ½ lime. Stir to combine. Taste, and if it’s not fantastic yet, add another teaspoon of tamari or a pinch of salt, as needed.

Slice the remaining ½ lime into wedges, then divide the fried rice into individual bowls. Garnish with wedges of lime and a sprinkling of torn cilantro leaves, with jars of tamari, chili garlic sauce and/or red pepper flakes on the side, for those who might want more.

Peace, love and Kelapo

-Gabriella

Continue Reading We’re Coconuts for Coconut Day!

We’re Coconuts for Coconut Day!